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Article

Australia: New data reveals Uber Eats riders earn only $5 for nearly 4km trip

"Uber Eats riders earning as little as $5 for deliveries crossing multiple NSW suburbs", 20 May 2021

Uber Eats riders in Australia are earning as little as $5 for individual deliveries that cross multiple suburbs, as riders complain that their pay was cut by the global tech giant during the pandemic.

[...]

[...] delivery company Menulog recently announced it would abandon the gig worker model and make all its workers employees within a “few years’ time”.

Menulog’s Australian managing director, Morten Belling, told NSW parliament that it would provide set hourly rates of pay and that this certainty for riders would benefit both employer and worker.

Belling said the company needed to do this to “meet its moral obligations” as an originally Australian-developed business.

[...]

A report commissioned by Uber between August and December found the average earnings for food deliverers was $21.55 an hour after costs – but only during meal times.

[...] a spokesman for Uber Eats referred Guardian Australia to the report, prepared by global consulting company Accenture.

The report contained no data on lowest and highest ranges of hourly pay.

[...] the Fair Work Commission also ruled that a worker for rival company Deliveroo was an employee, not a contractor.

[...]

A spokeswoman for Deliveroo said [...] “Riders have the absolute freedom to decide whether, when and where they work, and if they do go online they can decide how long to work and can freely reject any offer of work offered to them. Riders don’t need to provide personal service – they can and do use delegates to complete deliveries. Riders can and do work with multiple platforms, including competitors, at the same time – as Mr Franco did himself.”

The Deliveroo spokeswoman said the company would “appeal this decision to protect those freedoms”.