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Article

11 Feb 2015

Author:
Rebecca Smithers, Guardian (UK)

Briefing note by retailers, conservation & human rights groups sets out steps to end long-term threat of illegal fishing

"New guidance aims to keep products of pirate fishing out of UK supply chain", 9 Feb 2015

Illegal “pirate” fishing damages the environment and human rights, and leads to economic losses of as much as $23.5bn (£15.3 bn) a year, according to fresh guidance which aims to help British businesses keep illegal fish products out of the supply chain and stamp the practice out. A briefing published by retailers, conservation and human rights groups sets out in full how retailers and suppliers should act to end the long-term threat to the oceans, while building up legal and sustainable fisheries. It offers advice on risk-assessment and mitigation, and encourages action to prevent illegal fishery products entering UK supply chains. As much as 26 million tonnes of illegal fish products is involved annually. The briefing by the British Retail Consortium, Environmental Justice Foundation and WWF UK is to inform UK industry, retailers and brands of the risks associated with illegal, unreported and unregulated or pirate fishing.