abusesaffiliationarrow-downarrow-leftarrow-rightarrow-upattack-typeburgerchevron-downchevron-leftchevron-rightchevron-upClock iconclosedeletedevelopment-povertydiscriminationdollardownloademailenvironmentexternal-linkfacebookfiltergenderglobegroupshealthinformation-outlineinformationinstagraminvestment-trade-globalisationissueslabourlanguagesShapeCombined Shapeline, chart, up, arrow, graphlocationmap-pinminusnewsorganisationotheroverviewpluspreviewArtboard 185profilerefreshnewssearchsecurityPathStock downStock steadyStock uptagticktooltiptwitteruniversalityweb
Article

China: Students allegedly forced by schools to make Apple watches in factories through compulsory internships; co. says it is investigating

"Apple investigates report that Chinese students were forced to make its watches", 29 October 2018

Apple is investigating allegations that one of its suppliers illegally used high school students to assemble its watches at a factory in China.

Hong Kong-based labor rights group Students and Scholars Against Corporate Misbehavior (SACOM) said in a report...that it found students being made to work on Apple Watch production lines at a plant run by Quanta Computer....

The group alleges that students aged 16 to 19 were forced by their schools to work at the factory through compulsory internships...often made to work excessive overtime, and in some cases put on overnight shifts.

..."We are urgently investigating the report that student interns added in September are working overtime and night shifts," Apple said. "We have zero tolerance for failure to comply with our standards and we ensure swift action and appropriate remediation if we discover code violations."

Quanta Computer, which is headquartered in Taiwan, denied it takes school students on internships. It said...it always follows its customers standards and is working closely with Apple on the investigation.

One 18-year-old is cited as saying they worked on an Apple Watch production line that had a daily target of 1,200 units. "We are like robots on the production lines. We repeat the same procedure for hundreds and thousands of times every day," the student said, according to the report.