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Article

1 Mar 2012

Author:
Venable LLP (USA)

Forming a Corporate Political Action Committee

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Corporations often establish federal political action committees (“PAC”) to support the election of officials who are aligned with their businesses’ policy goals. PACs are necessary because the [United States] Federal Election Campaign Act (“FECA”) prohibits using corporate treasury funds to support federal candidates or political parties…A PAC is somewhat different from other entities associated with a corporation. It is a separate entity, but still managed by, and part of, the corporation.

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