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Nevsun Resources enters into a settlement in a lawsuit in Canada alleging torture & slavery at its subsidiary's Eritrean mine

"Landmark settlement is a message to Canadian companies extracting resources overseas: Amnesty International"

A human rights lawsuit alleging slavery and torture has been settled outside of court with a Canadian mining company for an undisclosed but "significant" amount, according to Amnesty International. In February 2020 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled the case could be heard in B.C. despite the fact it involved events in Africa. The terms of the settlement remain confidential but human rights advocates say the outcome of this legal proceeding will resonate.

Tara Scurr is the business and human rights campaigner for Amnesty International Canada. She says this case — brought forward by three refugees from Eritrea — involved allegations of torture, slavery and other human rights abuses. The fact that the Canadian mining company opted to settle the dispute will send a message. "It's a precedent-setting case. It's the first time that level of human rights abuse has been brought before a Canadian court for the activities of a Canadian extractives company overseas," said Scurr. She said this serves as an example that such cases can be heard in Canada and result in significant settlements with corporations.

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