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Routes to redress

The uncertainty over the fate of the US Alien Tort Statute and the recent withdrawal of legal aid in the UK for cases brought against multinational companies has prompted a debate about avenues to redress for corporate harm...Experts point out that in addition to ACTA, regional and local courts can be used by those seeking access to remedy...In the EU, Brussels 1 regulations on the jurisdiction of the courts set the rules for when courts can accept legal actions raised by victims from third countries...The International Court of Justice is another possible avenue to remedy for victims of corporate harm...Arbitration is another useful tool, Croft of Stakeholder Democracy points out...

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