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Article

12 Jul 2021

Author:
James Lynch, Thomson Reuters Foundation

OPINION: Want to protect migrants from trafficking? Make recruitment fair

........ The more responsible actors in the private sector have long been alert to the dangers of unethical recruitment and a range of initiatives have sprung up to provide guidance to corporate actors concerned about the impact of unethical recruitment practices on the workers in their supply chains.

But states, which pay very close attention to every detail of their annual TIP report have largely looked the other way on recruitment, which is not measured by any index, despite the obvious links between unfair recruitment and trafficking and forced labour. “Recruitment is their problem, not ours”, say governments in wealthy states, pointing back overseas at unscrupulous agents over whom they have no control.

But new research findings, based on extensive field work in five migration corridors and nine countries over 18 months exposes the falsity of these narratives.

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