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Article

31 Aug 2010

Author:
Pablo Fajardo and George Byrne, Harvard International Law Journal

Corporate Accountability, Human Rights and Pursuing Justice in the Ecuadorian Amazon: Attorney Pablo Fajardo’s Perspective on Aguinda v. Chevron

I live in the area affected by Chevron’s operations, and therefore I know personally the effects of the environmental and human rights abuses commited by the company in the Ecuadorian Amazon…multinational corporations are not bound by these [international human rights] conventions; the legislation only applies to governments, effectively rendering big business immune to international accountability…the least respected is the right to a healthy and ecologically balanced environment… The right to a healthy environment is the very foundation of health, culture and the economy...Chevron, must… address their business decisions from a moral perspective, and when they do not, legal frameworks must be in place to allow those affected to seek justice.

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