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[PDF] executive summary: "Business and International Crimes: Assessing the Liability of Business Entities for Grave Violations of International Law"

It is possible to hold business entities accountable for international crimes...but the problem of jurisdiction remains a barrier to international prosecution...Domestic courts are possible venues for assessing liability of companies operating abroad...especially through the doctrine of complicity. [refers to Talisman, Rio Tinto, Unocal, Shell, Chevron (part of ChevronTexaco), ExxonMobil, Freeport-McMoRan, Cape plc]

Part of the following stories

Chevron lawsuit (re Nigeria)

Rio Tinto lawsuit (re Papua New Guinea)

Shell lawsuit (re Nigeria - Kiobel & Wiwa)

Talisman lawsuit (re Sudan)

Unocal lawsuit (re Myanmar)

New study of business liability for grave violations of international law

Freeport-McMoRan lawsuits (re West Papua)

Cape/Gencor lawsuits (re So. Africa)

U.S. apparel cos. lawsuit (re Saipan)

Apartheid reparations lawsuits (re So. Africa)